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Category: Protocols

Clinical Corner: Mucus


Mucus (Catarrh): What You Need to Know

Mucus, also known as phlegm, is a vital substance produced by the respiratory system, including the nose, throat, and lungs. It serves as a frontline defender, trapping foreign particles like dust, pollen, and bacteria, and facilitating their removal from the body.

Why Excess Mucus Matters

Excessive or abnormal mucus production can indicate various medical conditions, including:

  • Respiratory Infections: Common colds, flu, bronchitis, pneumonia, sinusitis, and other respiratory infections can trigger increased mucus production.
  • Allergies: Allergic reactions can lead to heightened mucus production as the body attempts to expel allergens.
  • Asthma: This chronic respiratory condition often results in increased mucus production, accompanied by symptoms like coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath.
  • COPD: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, encompassing conditions like chronic bronchitis and emphysema, can cause excessive mucus production and breathing difficulties.
  • GERD: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease may cause stomach acid to back up into the throat, prompting excess mucus production.
  • Cystic Fibrosis: This genetic disorder affects the respiratory and digestive systems, leading to the buildup of thick, sticky mucus in the lungs and other organs.

Recognizing the Symptoms

Excessive mucus production can manifest alongside other symptoms, including:

  • Cough: A reflex action aimed at clearing mucus from the respiratory system.
  • Congestion: A sensation of fullness or blockage in the nose, sinuses, or chest due to excessive mucus.
  • Runny or Stuffy Nose: Often indicative of excess mucus in the sinuses or nasal passages.
  • Shortness of Breath: Difficulty breathing or feeling breathless.
  • Wheezing: Characterized by a high-pitched whistling sound during breathing, potentially linked to asthma or other respiratory conditions.
  • Chest Discomfort: A feeling of pressure or tightness in the chest, often associated with excess mucus in the airways.
  • Sore Throat: A scratchy or painful throat sensation, possibly due to postnasal drip or excessive throat mucus.
  • Fatigue: Feeling tired or lethargic as the body combats infection or inflammation.

If you’re experiencing excessive mucus production along with these symptoms, consult a doctor for an accurate diagnosis and suitable treatment options.

Exploring Treatment Options

When addressing mucus-related concerns, various essential oils can provide relief through methods like massage, diffusion, chakra work, and sustained inhalation. Consider incorporating oils like Ammi Visnaga, Basil, Cinnamon, Inula, Eucalyptus, Lemon, Marjoram, Niaouli, Pepper, Peppermint, Terebinth, and Thyme into your wellness routine.

Understanding mucus and its potential causes is the first step toward managing your respiratory health effectively.

Clinical Corner: Shingles

Shingles:

Apply ointment containing Peppermint, Ravensara, Eucalyptus Citriodora, and Lavender to areas of shingle outbreak. Do this 2-3x daily until relief has been achieved. You may rotate the use of neem oil on the area as well.

Lysine taken three times a day also provides substantial relief.

Clinical Corner: Gargle

Gargle: 

A few drops of essential oil are added to a glass of water with a pinch of salt. 

Gargle a few times then rinse.

Bleeding Gums: 

Single Oils: Cypress

Breath Freshener:

Single Oils: Anise, Peppermint, Cardamom, Caraway

Sore Throat:

Single Oils: Bay Laurel, Monarda (if caused by dental issues), Turmeric, Juniper

Strengthening to the gums:

Single Oils: Fennel. cypress, Thyme

Toothache:

Single Oils: Clove, Chamomile, Mastic, Peppermint, Spearmint, Myrhh, Coriander, Grapefruit, Lavender, Turmeric, Terebinth

Hygiene:

Single Oils: Frankincense, Myrrh, Fennel, Anise, Cinnamon, Eucalyptus 

Infection:

Single OIls: Bay Laurel, Tea Tree

Inflammation:

Single Oils: Geranium, Ginger

Gingivitis: 

Single Oils: Sage, Sandalwood, Hemlock Spruce

Tonic: 

Single Oils: Terebinth, Myrrh, Niaouli

Adenoids:

Single Oil: Terebinth 

Sinus Issues:

Single Oils: Juniper, Parsley, Celery

Clinical Corner: Accelerator Nerve

Accelerator Nerve

The term “accelerator nerve” is often used in the context of the autonomic nervous system to refer to nerves that are involved in increasing physiological functions, such as heart rate or other responses that prepare the body for action. The most common use of this term relates to the sympathetic nervous system’s role in accelerating heart rate.

In this context, the “accelerator nerve” typically refers to the cardioaccelerator nerve, also known as the cardiac accelerator nerve. This nerve is part of the sympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system, and it plays a role in increasing the heart rate and cardiac output as part of the body’s “fight or flight” response to stress or arousal.

When activated, the cardioaccelerator nerve releases the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (also known as noradrenaline). Norepinephrine binds to beta-adrenergic receptors on the heart’s muscle cells, specifically in the atria and ventricles. This binding leads to an increase in the heart rate (positive chronotropic effect) and an increase in the force of contraction (positive inotropic effect), resulting in a more efficient and rapid pumping of blood to meet increased demands.

The accelerator nerve, or cardioaccelerator nerve, is part of the sympathetic division’s control over the cardiovascular system, working in contrast to the parasympathetic nervous system’s role in slowing the heart rate. This balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic inputs helps regulate heart rate and cardiac function according to the body’s needs.

Technique

Blends: Paracelsus 

1. Application 

Sustained Inhalation 3 to 15 breathing cycles 

Feet

Lower legs

Knees / Thighs

Pelvis

Low Back / Lower abdomen

Whole abdominal Cavity

Mid Back

Chest / Upper Back

Tops of shoulders

Arms / forearms / hands

Neck

Jaws / whole head

2. Application 

Sustained Inhalation 3 to 15 breathing cycles

Back Head

Forehead

Back Heart

Front Heart

Clinical Corner: Deeper Diaphragm Release

Deeper Diaphragm Release: 

By working these two aspects of the diaphragm you increase breathing effiency, decrease tension in the neck region (especially the sternocleidomastoid which are the two rope like muscles that come from behind the ear and attach to the sternum and collarbone), relax the diaphragm, regulate and deepen the breath, decrease body tension, purifies the back solar plexus and back throat chakras, and helps with the cultivation of a quiet mind.

Working these two aspects together has a releasing effect on the fascia of the diaphragm which expels physiological stress on the body and oppositional thinking in the mind 

Costal Aspect of Diaphragm (associated with inhalation)

Single Oils: Hyssop, Hyssop Decumbens, Frankincense, Sitka, Inula, Myrtle

Blends: Bronchioles, Deep Breath

Sustained inhalation 3 to 15 breathing cycles

Back Solar Plexus

Throat Minor

Crural Aspect of Diaphragm (associated with exhalation)

Single Oils: Ammi Visnaga, Tolu Balsam, Peru Balsam, Fir Balsam, Poplar Balsam

Blends: Friar’s Balsam

Sustained inhalation 3 to 15 breathing cycles

Back Heart

Throat Minor

  • Enhanced by applying Thyme Linalool BT to chest / rib cage prior to doing this protocol
  • Enhanced by doing pursed lip breathing after this protocol 

Clinical Corner: Increasing Circulation to the Brain

Increasing Circulation to the Brain

1. Application

Single Oils: Camphor

a.
Back heart

b.
Armpits

Elbows

Wrists

Palms

Arms

c.
Hips

Knees

Ankles

Soles

Legs

d.
Lungs

Liver

Gallbladder 

Kidneys

Spleen

2. Application 

Single Oils: Rosemary Verbenone 

Sustained Inhalation 3 to 15 breathing cycles 

Feet

Lower legs

Knees / Thighs

Pelvis

Low Back / Lower abdomen

Whole abdominal Cavity

Mid Back

Chest / Upper Back

Tops of shoulders

Arms / forearms / hands

Neck

Jaws / whole head

Clinical Corner: Pain in Relation to Poor Sleep:

Excerpt from pain mechanisms and causes for poor sleep

Pain:

Perception and Interpretation: The processed pain signals are then relayed from the thalamus to the somatosensory cortex, which is responsible for the conscious perception of pain. The somatosensory cortex interprets the signals, allowing individuals to perceive and localize the pain.

Single Oils: Helichrysum, Poplar Balsam

Blends: Trauma Relief, Alpha 

Sustained Inhalation for 3 to 15 breathing cycles

Body Awareness (especially areas that are compromised, degenerating, or in pain)

Clinical Corner: Cardiac Fatigue/ Cardiac Stress/ Adrenal Hyper Reactivity:

Excerpt from: The Essentials Class

Cardiac Fatigue / Cardiac Stress / Adrenal Hyper Reactivity:

a. Cardiac fatigue, also known as heart fatigue or myocardial fatigue, refers to a condition in which the heart muscle becomes weakened and less efficient in pumping blood. This can have significant effects on a person’s health, leading to various complications and symptoms. Here are some of the potential effects of cardiac fatigue on health:

b. Reduced Exercise Capacity: 

Cardiac fatigue can lead to decreased cardiac output, which is the amount of blood pumped by the heart per minute. As a result, individuals may experience fatigue and reduced exercise tolerance. They may find it more challenging to engage in physical activities or exert themselves without becoming quickly tired.

c. Shortness of Breath: 

The weakened heart muscle in cardiac fatigue may struggle to pump blood effectively, leading to fluid buildup in the lungs. This can result in a condition called congestive heart failure, which is characterized by symptoms such as shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, and a sensation of heaviness or pressure in the chest.

d. Fluid Retention and Edema: 

Cardiac fatigue can impair the heart’s ability to pump blood efficiently, leading to fluid accumulation in various parts of the body. This can result in edema, which is swelling caused by excess fluid in the tissues. Edema commonly affects the ankles, legs, and abdomen in individuals with heart failure.

e. Increased Risk of Arrhythmias: 

The weakened heart muscle in cardiac fatigue may be more susceptible to irregular heart rhythms or arrhythmias. These abnormal heart rhythms can range from mild palpitations to more severe and potentially life-threatening conditions, such as ventricular tachycardia or atrial fibrillation.

f. Organ Damage: 

When the heart is unable to pump blood effectively, various organs and tissues in the body may not receive an adequate supply of oxygen and nutrients. Over time, this can lead to organ damage or dysfunction, including kidney problems, liver issues, and cognitive impairment.

g. Poor Quality of Life: 

Cardiac fatigue can significantly impact a person’s quality of life. Fatigue, limited physical abilities, and the burden of managing symptoms can lead to decreased mobility, social isolation, and emotional distress.

Single Oils: Inula, Neroli, Ylang Ylang, Melissa, Anise, Camphor, Rosemary Camphor, Terebinth, Sylvester Pine

Sustained Inhalation for 3-15 breathing cycles and repeat (done daily)

Brain Awareness

Kidneys

Meng Mein 

Back Heart

Crown

Clinical Corner: Pain

Excerpt from pain mechanisms and causes for poor sleep

Pain:

Perception and Interpretation:

The processed pain signals are then relayed from the thalamus to the somatosensory cortex, which is responsible for the conscious perception of pain. The somatosensory cortex interprets the signals, allowing individuals to perceive and localize the pain.

Single Oils:

Helichrysum, Poplar Balsam

Blends:

Trauma Relief, Alpha 

Sustained Inhalation for 3 to 15 breathing cycles

Body Awareness (especially areas that are compromised, degenerating, or in pain)

Clinical Corner: Sleep

Sleep

The stages of sleep can be broadly categorized into two main types: non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. These stages cycle throughout the night in a pattern known as the sleep architecture. Here is an excerpt from sleep mechanisms


Excerpt: Sleep Mechanisms

Stage N3 (NREM 3): Also referred to as deep sleep or slow-wave sleep (SWS), this stage is characterized by the presence of slow brainwaves called delta waves. It is the deepest and most restorative stage of sleep, crucial for physical restoration, growth, and repair. Blood pressure drops, breathing slows down, and the body’s energy is replenished during this stage.

Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep:

Single Oils: Bergamot, Mugwort

Blends: Delta

Sustained Inhalation for 3-15 breathing cycles

Spinal Awareness

Limb Awareness